Are we okay with handing over the helm of our life to God? Are we okay with praying that God’s Kingdom come even if it requires our kingdoms of health, kingdoms of finances, kingdoms of relationships, and all the rest of our kingdoms are destroyed?

Grant Boldness

Christians throughout history have been praying dangerous prayers for as long as there has been a church.

In the early church, when the Apostles lives were at risk, they didn’t pray for protection and safety. Acts 4:29 reads, “And now, Lord, look upon their threats and grant to your servants to continue to speak your word with all boldness.”

The Apostles prayed for boldness, not safety. That is a dangerous prayer.

John Wesley’s Prayer

Tradition teaches that John Wesley prayed a dangerous prayer every single day. His prayer is now often referred to as The Wesley Covenant Prayer or Wesley’s Covenant Prayer. Here it is:

“I am no longer my own, but yours.
Put me to what you will, place me with whom you will.
Put me to doing, put me to suffering.
Let me be put to work for you or set aside for you,
Praised for you or criticized for you.
Let me be full, let me be empty.
Let me have all things, let me have nothing.
I freely and fully surrender all things to your glory and service.
And now, O wonderful and holy God,
Creator, Redeemer, and Sustainer,
you are mine, and I am yours.
So be it.
And the covenant which I have made on earth,
Let it also be made in heaven. Amen.”

I have pastor friends in The Wesleyan Church who keep this prayer on cards in their wallets to remind them of their calling to follow God wherever and however He leads; although, the prayer is relevant to all Christians, not only pastors.

Thomas à Kempis’ Prayer

Another individual who prayed a dangerous prayer was Thomas à Kempis. Here is his prayer:

“Lord, you know what is best. May your will decide what should be done. Give what You will, how much You will, and when You will. Do what you know is best for me. Do what pleases You and brings your name the most honor. Put me where You will, and deal with me in all things as You please. I am in your hand. Turn me backwards and forwards, turn me upside down. Here I am, Your servant, ready for anything, for I have no desire to live for myself, but only to live perfectly and worthily for you.”

Your Kingdom Come

When Jesus is teaching His disciples (which include us) how to pray in Matthew 6, verse 10 reads, Your kingdom come, your will be done.

When we take time and process this portion of the Lord’s Prayer, we find that it is very dangerous.

When we pray, “God, your kingdom come…,” we are also praying, “…even if that means you have to overthrow our kingdoms.”

This is a dangerous prayer.

Are we okay with handing over the helm of our life to God? Are we okay with praying that God’s Kingdom come even if it requires our kingdoms of health, kingdoms of finances, kingdoms of relationships, and all the rest of our kingdoms are destroyed?

Now of course, God may desire some of us to prosper in some of those areas for His glory, but He may also want us to whither in those areas because we would be able to give Him more glory in testifying to His goodness despite our current circumstances.

Now, can we in boldness pray this dangerous prayer, “God, your kingdom come, your will be done?”